Hello, Middle Class!

thehealthycook:

1) SPEND TIME EACH WEEK LOOKING FOR RECIPES.This may feel like an indulgence, but just let yourself do it. Browse blogs and websites for recipes that look delicious. Hang out on Tasteologie. Pile up some cookbooks and reach fo the sticky notes. Get inspired!
2) CREATE A PLACE TO SAVE YOUR RECIPES, and keep it SIMPLE. Do whatever works for you. Don’t get caught up in a system, just use whatever works best and most easily. Personally, I like Pinterest because it’s easy to visually browse what I’ve saved. (Watch for another post coming soon with a rundown of our readers’ favorite places to save recipes.
3) ASK OTHERS WHAT THEY WANT TO EAT. Like. your partner, family, and roommates. This might sound obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in our weeks and forget to ask our households what they would like to eat. I get extra inspired, too, when I feel like I’m cooking a meal as a gift — trying to please and delight the palate of someone I love.
4) KEEP A MEAL JOURNAL. One of my best inspirations is my own record of things I’ve cooked in the past. Take a look at what you were cooking a year ago, two years ago. It’s a good way to remember things you used to cook, and still love.
5) START A CALENDAR. Now that you’re getting inspired in what to eat, start a calendar of what you’d like to cook over the next few days or few weeks. It can be as organized as a Google Calendar, with notes on each day for that day’s menu. Or you can just jot notes to yourself in the corner of your laptop screen. The important thing is to write it down.
6) GO WITH THEME NIGHTS. (soup night, pasta night, beans). I find find it really helpful to have a theme night each week. This doesn’t work for everyone, but it may be especially helpful for those with kids. Keeping the focus narrow will help you and your household make quick recipe decisions.
7) CHOOSE A SHOPPING DAY AND MAKE A LIST. A lot of the readers who seemed to have success in meal planning shopped very purposefully. They looked at their recipes and made a shopping list. Some of the meal planning and recipe-saving services let you do this easily, extracting ingredients from the recipes you have saved.
8) CHECK WHATS ON SALE. Some people really like to organize their meals around sales. Is organic chicken a dollar off this week? Or canned chickpeas? Check out your grocery store circular and adjust your meal plan or shopping list a bit.
9) PLAN FOR LEFTOVERS. Most of us have at least some tolerance for leftovers. I regularly cook one or two big healthy casseroles at the beginning of the week and eat off them all week long for lunch. Some people can only eat leftovers for a single night. Either way, try to make your cooking always do double duty. Make a little extra of everything, and if you don’t want it right away, freeze it.
SOURCE:
http://www.thekitchn.com/10-tips-for-better-weekly-meal-planning-reader-intelligence-report-177252

thehealthycook:

1) SPEND TIME EACH WEEK LOOKING FOR RECIPES.
This may feel like an indulgence, but just let yourself do it. Browse blogs and websites for recipes that look delicious. Hang out on Tasteologie. Pile up some cookbooks and reach fo the sticky notes. Get inspired!

2) CREATE A PLACE TO SAVE YOUR RECIPES, and keep it SIMPLE. Do whatever works for you. Don’t get caught up in a system, just use whatever works best and most easily. Personally, I like Pinterest because it’s easy to visually browse what I’ve saved. (Watch for another post coming soon with a rundown of our readers’ favorite places to save recipes.

3) ASK OTHERS WHAT THEY WANT TO EAT. Like. your partner, family, and roommates. This might sound obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in our weeks and forget to ask our households what they would like to eat. I get extra inspired, too, when I feel like I’m cooking a meal as a gift — trying to please and delight the palate of someone I love.

4) KEEP A MEAL JOURNAL. One of my best inspirations is my own record of things I’ve cooked in the past. Take a look at what you were cooking a year ago, two years ago. It’s a good way to remember things you used to cook, and still love.

5) START A CALENDAR. Now that you’re getting inspired in what to eat, start a calendar of what you’d like to cook over the next few days or few weeks. It can be as organized as a Google Calendar, with notes on each day for that day’s menu. Or you can just jot notes to yourself in the corner of your laptop screen. The important thing is to write it down.

6) GO WITH THEME NIGHTS. (soup night, pasta night, beans). I find find it really helpful to have a theme night each week. This doesn’t work for everyone, but it may be especially helpful for those with kids. Keeping the focus narrow will help you and your household make quick recipe decisions.

7) CHOOSE A SHOPPING DAY AND MAKE A LIST. A lot of the readers who seemed to have success in meal planning shopped very purposefully. They looked at their recipes and made a shopping list. Some of the meal planning and recipe-saving services let you do this easily, extracting ingredients from the recipes you have saved.

8) CHECK WHATS ON SALE. Some people really like to organize their meals around sales. Is organic chicken a dollar off this week? Or canned chickpeas? Check out your grocery store circular and adjust your meal plan or shopping list a bit.

9) PLAN FOR LEFTOVERS. Most of us have at least some tolerance for leftovers. I regularly cook one or two big healthy casseroles at the beginning of the week and eat off them all week long for lunch. Some people can only eat leftovers for a single night. Either way, try to make your cooking always do double duty. Make a little extra of everything, and if you don’t want it right away, freeze it.

SOURCE:
http://www.thekitchn.com/10-tips-for-better-weekly-meal-planning-reader-intelligence-report-177252

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

dynamicafrica:

Great Concern As Parents of Missing #Chibok Schoolgirls Tragically Pass Away.
This headline is so shocking and heartbreaking it’s almost unbelievable. 11 parents of the missing Chibok schoolgirls have died or have been killed in the three months since their abduction.
According to a report by AP, seven of the girls’ fathers were among over 50 bodies that were brought to a hospital in the area after an attack on the nearby village of Kautakari this month. Four more parents are said to have died from heart failure, high blood pressure and other illnesses many blame on the trauma sustained from this incident.
Speaking out on this issue, community leader Pogo Bitrus has said, “one father of two of the girls kidnapped just went into a kind of coma and kept repeating the names of his daughters, until life left him.”
Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, who has been heavily criticized for his slow response and the ineffective manner in which he has been handling both this situation and the greater Boko Haram threat, met with some of the victim’s parents and their classmates on Tuesday where he promised to continue efforts to bring back the girls alive.
Meanwhile, the town of Chibok seems to be in more and more danger as Boko Haram continue to gain ground in the surrounding area. Over the weekend, the terrorist group launched several raids in northeastern Nigerian towns and villages where they also attacked an army base in the strategic town of Damboa. This particular attack saw as many as 15, 000 civilians fleeing the area as a result.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

dynamicafrica:

Great Concern As Parents of Missing #Chibok Schoolgirls Tragically Pass Away.

This headline is so shocking and heartbreaking it’s almost unbelievable. 11 parents of the missing Chibok schoolgirls have died or have been killed in the three months since their abduction.

According to a report by AP, seven of the girls’ fathers were among over 50 bodies that were brought to a hospital in the area after an attack on the nearby village of Kautakari this month. Four more parents are said to have died from heart failure, high blood pressure and other illnesses many blame on the trauma sustained from this incident.

Speaking out on this issue, community leader Pogo Bitrus has said, “one father of two of the girls kidnapped just went into a kind of coma and kept repeating the names of his daughters, until life left him.”

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, who has been heavily criticized for his slow response and the ineffective manner in which he has been handling both this situation and the greater Boko Haram threat, met with some of the victim’s parents and their classmates on Tuesday where he promised to continue efforts to bring back the girls alive.

Meanwhile, the town of Chibok seems to be in more and more danger as Boko Haram continue to gain ground in the surrounding area. Over the weekend, the terrorist group launched several raids in northeastern Nigerian towns and villages where they also attacked an army base in the strategic town of Damboa. This particular attack saw as many as 15, 000 civilians fleeing the area as a result.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | PinterestSoundcloud | Mixcloud

micdotcom:

Watch: Black teen uses Vine to catch white people following him around stores 

These videos allegedly show a number of convenience store clerks nonchalantly following Polo to “make sure” he doesn’t steal anything.
They are not slick. Each time Polo catches them snooping, his accusatory outburst sends them scurrying down the aisles. 
It would be hilarious social commentary if it was so real.
Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

Watch: Black teen uses Vine to catch white people following him around stores 

These videos allegedly show a number of convenience store clerks nonchalantly following Polo to “make sure” he doesn’t steal anything.

They are not slick. Each time Polo catches them snooping, his accusatory outburst sends them scurrying down the aisles. 

It would be hilarious social commentary if it was so real.

Follow micdotcom

(Source: moreleftthannot)

This is a photo of 17 year old Elsemiek de Borst. She was aboard the ill-fated Malaysian flight MH17. Her father, Hans, wrote a letter to the people he believes to be responsible for the death of this daughter. This letter is heartbreaking. Lennart Peeters translated it to english. Here’s the facebook link. 

This is a photo of 17 year old Elsemiek de Borst. She was aboard the ill-fated Malaysian flight MH17. Her father, Hans, wrote a letter to the people he believes to be responsible for the death of this daughter. This letter is heartbreaking. Lennart Peeters translated it to english. Here’s the facebook link

idontlovetheseh0es:

naturallycurlycoco:

elionking:

Black women with afros

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Black women with dread locks

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Black women with dyed hair

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Black women with natural hair

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Black women with relaxed hair

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Black women with weaves

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Black women with hair

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Black women without hair

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Black women

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Yasssss

needed

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